Steve Saideman is Professor and the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. He has written The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy and International Conflict; For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism and War (with R. William Ayres); and NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone (with David Auerswald), and elsewhere on nationalism, ethnic conflict, civil war, and civil-military relations.

http://www.stevesaideman.com

Which Costs Matter?

There has been much focus, and deservedly so, on the economic sanctions hitting Russia hard.  The problem is whether they hit those who support Putin or not, and whether they create economic opportunities for those who are good at evading the law (the police, organized crime) who also happen to be tied to Putin.

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The Duckies of 2015

We gave out the Online Achievement in International Studies (OAIS) a.k.a. the Duckies, Thursday night, in a wonderful reception sponsored by SAGE.  Given that this is Oscar night, we should say that there are no winners, just that the Duckies went to:

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ISA 2015 Update: Bloggers Win

Yesterday, the Governing Council met for 17 days and nights …. or about six hours to discuss the various issues on the agenda.  I will not get into the details of the meeting (I live-tweeted the highlights).    The key bits of news are this:

  • I learned how to do emoji on my Ipad.
  • The blogging issue from last year produced a report by the Professional Responsibilities committee, and the recommendations which became policy essentially said that we ought to expect everyone to be professional and treat each other with respect and dignity.
    • This applies to not just ISA journal editors who were the focus last year.
    • They deliberately chose not to ask bloggers to put disclaimers on their blogs since everyone would have to be disclaiming pretty much everything they do.
    • A clear win for the social media folks.
  • The Online Media Caucus sailed through.  Through a clever bit of agenda-setting that I had nothing to do with, it was the penultimate issue considered and exhaustion was our friend.  So, come to the business meeting on Saturday at 12:30 in the Hilton’s Elmwood room as well as the Duckies Thursday night at 7:30pm at the Quarterdeck rooms in the Hilton

ISA Non-Panels: Fun and Games In IR

The annual meeting of the International Studies Association kicks off on Tuesday and runs through Saturday, Feb 17th-21st.  The program is chock full of all kinds of IR.  Of course, there is much to do and see during and after Mardi Gras in New Orleans beyond the panels.  Using my power here as Duck-ster, let me point out a few ones that you might want to consider attending/joining:

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Global shift – the US, China, and the Hong Kong Protests

This is a guest post by Grant Dawson, assistant professor of social science and international politics at The University of Nottingham, Ningbo, China and Cyrus Janssen is an American expat based in Asia.

The global order established by the West and led by the US since 1945 is gradually changing. China and the ‘rising Rest’ are catching-up to the US and the West in terms of economic and political power. Unfortunately, as was clear during the Hong Kong protests, the West’s ideas and attitudes about China are not keeping pace, and may lead to misunderstandings that undermine political relations during a crucial transitional period for everyone.

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Friday Nerd Blogging: Everything is Awesome Edition

I am a huge fan of the Lego Movie, which is almost an IR movie, given that Will Moore is related to one of the movie’s creators.  But this somewhat critical take on the film is still delightful:

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ISA Preparations: Ultimate Edition

Save room on your schedules for some Ultimate:

I am hoping that there will be enough space and too few drunken folks on the playing field at Woldenberg Park at 10am on Saturday of ISA week.  It is just up the river (if you look at a map, it looks is up and to the right of the Hilton along the waterfront).  Bring a dark shirt and a light shirt.  Cleats are optional. I will bring the cones and the disks.

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Ethnic Security Dilemma Regrets

One of the regrets of my career is that I was developing the ethnic security dilemma concept the same time as Barry Posen, who published his in Survival in 1993.  As I prepared for my comprehensive exams in 1991 in IR and Comparative Politics, I focused on ethnic politics for the latter exam.  I wrote papers that developed the IR concept for ethnic politics, got nice comments from my profs, but moved on to the dissertation. I should have tried to publish the piece–I would have scooped Posen.

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Friday Nerd Blogging: Belated But Delightful Take on Harry Potter and Feminism

Actually, the title for this post should refer to Hermione Granger since she is the one doing the smashing of patriarchy in this amusing and insightful take on feminism in the world of Harry Potter.  The language is not safe for work.

Online Media Caucus Update for ISA 2015

The effort to develop a caucus at the ISA dedicating to Online Media continues.  The proposed caucus will be considered at the Governing Council meeting on Tuesday of the ISA this year.  I have not received any signs that this will not go through.  Consequently, we are having our first business meeting on Saturday, February 21st, 12:30pm in the Hilton’s Elmwood room.  The meeting will sketch out the plans for the next year and seek advice/feedback on future activities.

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Common Xenophobic Dynamic: Overestimating the Other

I saw this on twitter this evening

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ISA Blogging Update: Committee Reports Recommendations

Last winter, the ISA executive committee proposed new rules for editors of ISA journals that would restrict their blogging.  This led to a pretty hostile reaction.  At the ISA meeting, the proposal was sent to committee.  The committee has circulated its report and recommendations.

What do they recommend?  Basically, the recommendations: Continue reading

Friday Nerd Blogging: Star Wes Awakens

The folks here are big, big fans of Star Wars, so we were most happy this week with the new teaser. Many parodies have/will ensue. Here is the Wes Anderson take:

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Friday Nerd Blogging: Twitter Much?

As a very frequent tweeter, I could only watch this SNL sketch/dance number (didn’t make it to the show, just to dress rehearsal) with just a hint of shame:

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Friday Nerd Blogging: Princess Bride FTW

Check out this set of tweets tying together feminism and Princess Bride.  My guess is that you check out #feministprincessbride you will find many more.  The movie keeps on giving.

Some Book Publishing Tips

Yesterday, I was part of a panel at Carleton organized to provide other profs/students with suggestions about how to get their stuff published in book form.  The Canadian process is different from the American process, so I spent my ten minutes on the lessons I learned from my experiences with American publishers.

What did I say?

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The Costs of Irredentism

In For Kin or Country, the basic idea is to explain a set of policies that is always expensive.  When one tries to take the territory of another country, there tends to be a response.  While folks dismissed Obama’s line about Putin’s moves having a cost, it turns out that he was right.

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Friday Nerd Blogging: Awakened Edition

I have yet to see any video that plays upon the news that Star Wars Episode VII has a new title: The Force Awakens.  But twitter was abuzz yesterday with alternatives.  So, here is two of mine:

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Friday Nerd Blogging: Belated Halloween Edition

I have fallen behind in my Friday Nerd Blogging contributions, so I have this belated Halloween video:

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Conversation Hijacking: How Not To Insert Yourself into a Conversation by Pushing a Woman Out of It

This is a guest post from Kathleen Gallagher Cunningham, an associate professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland.  She is the author of Inside the Politics of Self-determination (Oxford University Press, 2014).

I was recently at a relatively small academic conference, one that I’ve been attending for years whenever I can. The size of the meeting encourages engagement between big names and small names, grad students and professors, and across genders. It is a classic academic mixer, filled with slightly awkward people, many of whom are slightly disheveled, talking about things that are really interesting in really boring ways (to outsiders).

I started attending as a grad student and have made a number of critical personal and professional connections. In addition to getting useful feedback on my own work, this venue is a great opportunity to reconnect with people in my field and get to know some new ones. While I began as a young grad student, I am now at place where I am a (newly) senior member in the field.

After the final session one day, while people trickled out of the room, I sat down with a colleague I hadn’t seen for years. I was just hearing about a fascinating research project he’s working on when another person (another senior man in the field, though I’m not sure that matters) walked up and sat down, smiled at me but did not introduce himself and started a totally independent conversation with my colleague. I got up a few minutes later to make another meeting, but this small event stayed with me.

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